Tag Archives: Confidentiality

Handling “Stuckness”

Photo by Rob Potter

By Adrianna Huff

A few years ago, I started to feel stuck. I didn’t just wake up one morning and feel stuck, but rather it snuck up on me slowly. Since it felt like more of a professional “stuckness”, I started frantically applying for jobs, looking for classes, and haphazardly trying to change my professional world. I wasted a lot of money, and ended up feeling a little burnt out before I found my right direction.

I learned some valuable lessons on feeling stuck and how to handle “stuckness”. Here are the suggestions I would give to myself in the future.

  1. Assess the current situation:

For me at least, feeling stuck drives from not being challenged. Instead of making a drastic movement to get out of “stuckness”, take a minute and review the situation. Talk about it with a friend, co-worker, or fellow High Stakes Mastermind Group member. Is there a new role or challenge that I can be taking? Can I find a new niche within what I am doing that will give me the challenge? Sometimes, it just takes a little thinking outside the box to find a new opportunity to get unstuck.

  1. Complete some outside of work training:
    While I would like to think I get my entire professional fulfillment from work, this isn’t true. In the future, I would look for classes to take to broaden my career knowledge or personal interests. There are opportunities through Skillshare.com (including those taught by High Stakes Mastermind Group leader, Stephanie Angelo), Coursera.com, local community college classes, and even webinars online. Not only could I have continued to develop myself professionally, but I may have found personal fulfillment in the training.
  2. Research, Research, Research:
    I sound like my music instructor from my childhood (practice, practice, practice), but I can’t stress more the importance of research. If you decide to change roles or the way you structure your business, read about the benefits and implications. Make sure it is a good fit, before jumping.
  3. Step away:
    One of the best things for me when I feel stuck is to step away from the situation. I don’t mean to completely avoid it, but instead I try to stop focusing on it. Stepping away for a short break provides me with clarity, and allows me to think clearly. Instead of feeling like I must fix the problem, I am able to make sure I know what I need. Again, speaking with a friend, co-worker, or your fellow High Stakes Mastermind participant may provide you with a new perspective.
  4. Make a plan of action:
    Instead of acting in panic mode, slowly and carefully make a plan of action. I don’t know of any situations that have been well handled in a reactionary state. Draft up a goal plan (like we do in our High Stakes Mastermind Group) and make logical steps to complete those goals. Either have your High Stakes Mastermind Group hold you accountable or a friend or co-worker can keep you accountable to your new action plan.
  5. Give yourself grace:
    If in the end, if you take what you believe to be a well considered leap, and it doesn’t work out, give yourself grace. Everyone makes mistakes, I firmly believe it is better to try something new (and later find out it was not right) than to live in constant fear of not making the right choice. I would rather learn my decision did not completely meet my needs than to live in a state of “if only”.

How do you handle “stuckness”? Do you have any additional suggestions on how to make professional or personal changes?

 

Adrianna Huff is a member of High Stakes Mastermind Groups

 

 

 

The Ultimate Success Plan – Masterminding with Confidants

Senior Lady Giving an idea to her Colleagues
Mastermind member sharing an idea to her group

The Ultimate Success Plan – Masterminding with Confidants

The journey to the top of your game, no matter what industry you’re in, can be a very lonely one, especially if you are a solopreneur or an entrepreneur. Sometimes, it will seem like nobody really understands you, from the professional challenges you face to the personal and social sacrifices that are sometimes involved with such a heavy time commitment as running your own business.

So as you climb the ladder, it’s exceptionally important to build your personal network of support and confidants.  “Confidants”.  Interesting word, right?  Webster’s Dictionary describes “confidant” as “one to whom secrets are confided”.  I can tell you from my years of Mastermind experience that one of the toughest issues that holds people back from progress is not having anyone to talk to.  And I mean really talk to.

Confidants can help you in a number of ways. People that you meet in High Stakes Mastermind groups, for example, understand what challenges you’re facing, because they’re in the same positions and know those challenges to be true. Over time relationships and trust builds, which allow for the sharing of ideas, solutions and strategies. Confidants willingly share advice with you that worked in similar situations for them.

Confidants are important for every business person, but are even more important when you’re self-employed. This is because for much of the time, you’re likely working independently, or with your staff, without the aid of a corporate headquarters. Often, this means that you have no peers to bounce ideas for solutions and strategies off of. Those you are working with are often not on the same level.

Mastermind group members are often in other lines of work, and they can become true confidants with nothing to gain from your industry secrets.

One final promise for having confidants in a Mastermind group: that it’s an especially good idea to have confidants who are as successful and trained as you are, or even more so, to discuss ideas and strategies with – and to help you discover solutions to problems unique to your business.

We know confidentiality is so important our members sign a promissory agreement. But fear not, you’ll still see the evidence of it – in their success.

Stephanie

Humming bird only teeny tiny