Category Archives: Uncategorized

Your Facebook Questions Answered- Part 1

Photo by William Iven

During a High Stakes Mastermind meeting a few weeks ago, we got onto the topic of social media engagement, and especially Facebook. The Facebook platform has 1.4 billion daily active users, and with this tremendous reach, it can be highly useful for entrepreneurs and business owners. During this discussion, there were many questions that came up about Facebook, and I took it as my mission to jot down those questions and get some answers to you. Thus, we have “Your Facebook Questions Answered- Part 1”. Any follow up questions, I will answer in a part 2.

Before I jump into the actual questions and answers, Facebook has training for anyone interested called Facebook Blueprint. There are 90 different webinars, and I have not had a chance to see all of them, but they have a vast amount of information about how to work in Facebook as a business owner. The link to Facebook Blueprint is here.

Let’s jump into the questions:

  1. Tell me more about the Facebook algorithm. How does it work?

Facebook posted on its newsroom platform in January of 2018, that in 2018 the Facebook algorithm would be focusing more on bringing its users closer together. Instead of just curating the news feed based on user reactions to content, now meaningful posts and comments from family and friends will be ranked higher on individual users news feeds. For example, a user will see in his or her news feed more of the posts that are likely to have or have significant discussion.

In addition, according to a video from Adam Mosseri, Head of News Feed for Facebook, the ranking algorithm focuses on inventory (available Facebook content), signals (age of posting, who posted, your internet connection, etc.), predictions (comment or share likelihood), and relevancy (how interested a user will be). Relevancy, and the age of the content is then used to create a user’s personalized news feed.

So in effect, if content does not have as much engagement, it may fall off a user’s news feed. Users can always choose “See First in News Feed Preferences” to receive all of a page or group’s content, so this will always appear on the news feed.

  1. How do personal and professional or business Facebook pages work together? What linking is required?

To create a professional business Facebook page, you need to have a personal page. Based on the new Facebook algorithm, posting on both your personal and professional page, and even sharing your professional post from your personal page, would be a reasonable way to increase your reach and create engagement with the content. If your personal page creates discussion about your professional page’s post, this could make its way higher onto the news feed of your Facebook friends and make it more of a highly engaged and shared posting.

  1. How do you find and analyze your Facebook demographic information?

A Facebook help article, “How do I see data about the people who like my Page”, explains Facebook Insights and how to use that information to look the demographic and like information on your Facebook page. Facebook Insights is a special feature for non-personal Facebook pages that allows you to export data that contains the following: engagement with your page, page performance metrics, and what posts receive the most Facebook engagement.

  1. How frequently should I post per day?

It depends, which I know is not a great answer, but it does. Depending on what article you read or your goal, it could be anywhere from 1-3 times per day. I would suggest testing different posting strategies to determine optimal engagement for your page. For example, test with one post for a while and see what the engagement looks like. Then test with adding a second post, and see if or how engagement changes.

The most important thing to remember is that creating quality content and driving strong engagement will be the best ways to showcase your posts in the news feed.

  1. When are the best times to post on social media platforms like Facebook?

According to an article on Sprout Social, “Best Times to Post on Social Media- 2018 Industry Research”, the best times to post on Facebook are Wednesday at 12 and 2 PM and Thursday at 1 and 2 PM. Thursday is the optimal weekday to post on Facebook. Saturday tends to be a low engagement day on Facebook, since users tend to be out and about enjoying their weekends.

Although, I would add, that just like how frequently to post on Facebook, it would be advisable to test how your posts best reach your intended audience. Your Facebook users and audience may be different from the industry standard.

  1. How do Facebook likes really translate to engagement?

With the latest algorithm, the back and forth of discussion is one of the greatest ways to increase engagement and notice for your work on Facebook. Clicking on content, viewing, and watching content won’t get you the reactions you need. Commenting, sharing, and having a discussion will drive the most engagement. Likes fall somewhere in between. They can be used as a way to gauge if the user finds the content useful, but unless the user comments or engages, that may be the end of the interaction.

Some possible ways to increase engagement, outside of just “likes”, are to create a poll for your audience or include questions on your posts are a great way to encourage comments and interaction from your audience.

  1. Should I be posting videos on Facebook?

Yes, you should definitely be posting videos into Facebook, and live videos are better than pre-recorded videos. Based on Facebook research, “live videos on average get six times as many interactions as regular videos”. Videos are what drive Facebook interaction, and to work with the latest algorithm, videos are going to be one of the best ways to get your content noticed.

Additionally, posting videos directly in Facebook, instead of posting an external link, for example, may aid you in getting your posts seen by more users in the news feed.

Facebook is a constantly evolving social media platform, so it’s always a good idea to continue to check into the Facebook Newsroom for updates. With that in mind, how do you use Facebook? What other Facebook questions do you have?

 

Written by guest writer Adrianna Huff in collaboration with High Stakes Mastermind Groups

Taking the Silo out of Solo

Photo by Jeremy Olson

What does it mean to take the “silo out of solo”?

You’ll often hear me say that in High Stakes Mastermind Groups we take the “silo out of solo”. But what exactly does that mean? Here’s the thing: it is lonely at the top.

What that means is that when you’re at the top of an organization, whether you have lots of employees or just a few, maybe you’re a solopreneur with no one around but your office cat, you’ll frequently find that you don’t really have anybody that you can talk to. Especially when it’s within your own company. You’re solo – going at it alone. You’re not going to tell your employees your insecurities, that you have doubts, that you’re debating about signing a new contract, or about a choice that you might make with marketing, or a new product, or any number of things that happen in the day-to-day.

There are hundreds of choices that business owners have to make. And there’s an uncomfortable feeling of having to keep up appearances. Typically that of confidence. How can a team leader, or company leader, show their employees and coworkers that they have occasional doubts and insecurities? We are all human, and we all have these emotions from time to time. But there’s a really difficult stigma, when you’re at the top of an organization, to show these vulnerabilities. But here you are; solo, and in a silo.

Tales from a Bad Experience

In High Stakes Mastermind Groups we welcome those vulnerabilities at the times they occur. I had my own personal experience years ago when I was a member of my very first mastermind group. A friend of mine had invited me to be in this group and it was led by one of the members, which in and of itself is the first mistake because I strongly believe that all mastermind group should be led by an outside facilitator that isn’t a part to the actual mastermind itself. But getting back to the story there was a day when I was under tremendous stress and I was feeling extremely emotional as a result of it. During the meeting I vented. I cried and I was emotional. I felt that of all people, these were the ones that would have my back.
Or so I thought. Imagine my shock when three days after that meeting I got a call from the so-called “leader”, who told me that she and the other members had decided that they didn’t want me in the group anymore. I was shocked and deeply, deeply, hurt. The only person who really didn’t support that choice was the same person who had invited me to the group in the first place.

Going Forward

That experience taught me that in my own mastermind groups I will never let that happen to a member. I’ve told all members when they begin a group that I never allow anyone to be abusive to anybody else, but should the day occur where somebody is having particular trouble, and they need the rest of us to support them, we would be there for them. No questions asked. And we’ve had to be there for our members from time to time. But truthfully it doesn’t happen very often. Our meetings are business based. We conduct business and we hold one another accountable to meeting our business goals. We are a group of strong achievers. But even a strong achiever feels like they’re in a silo from time to time. And that is my why to take the “silo out of solo”. You can even hear a little clip where I reference that during a radio interview: https://www.dropbox.com/s/0gq8tyogjtbte1y/Take%20the%20Silo%20out%20of%20the%20Solo.mp3?dl=0

If you ever find yourself feeling like you would be stronger if you were part of a tribe, and that your business would benefit by having like-minded achievement-oriented individuals around you, who would accept you warts and all, give us a call: 480.646.2400 We’d love to hear from you.

Masterminding Can Be Like Parenting Someone Else’s Child

Parenting – if you can do that, you can mastermind.

Some of you may know that I have my fourth exchange student living with us right now. I’ve decided that there are some interesting similarities between parenting somebody else’s child living with you and masterminding.  Now, that may seem like a really weird correlation but read on…

We’ve had four exchange students and so I know that one of the tough things about being the parent of an exchange student is that real life sets in after the “getting to know each other phase” and it’s difficult to parent someone else’s child. As a parent sometimes there are “discipline” types of things that occur. Maybe they’re not emptying the dishwasher when you’ve asked them to, or they’re not getting their homework done and teachers are emailing, or things of that nature.  There are also a lot of great things, just like with your own children, like when they participate in school sports you go and cheer them on.  Or you attend their school play.  You want to support them, and be parents to them, as if they were your own child. Yet there’s this little part that’s detached because this kid doesn’t really belong to you and it’s also temporary.  At some point you hug goodbye at an airport and return home to their empty room.

That’s where I see an interesting connection to Mastermind groups.  When you’re involved in a mastermind group you want to talk about what’s going on in your organization and get feedback from the other members, and sometimes you have to remind yourself that these members don’t really have buy-in to your company, except that they care about your success the same way that you care about their success in their own companies.

Like parenting someone else’s child their success is your own success.  If your fellow Mastermind group members do well in their businesses; they grow their businesses and achieve their goals, then when they succeed you also succeed.  Because you had a connection and involvement in what happened to their business because you were there to give advice, brainstorm, and support them.  In our High Stakes Mastermind Groups, we call it taking the “Silo out of Solo”.

Being in a mastermind group is a responsibility you sign on to – to be a support mechanism for others. And the payoff is really huge.  Just like when you see your own kid walk across that stage and carry away their diploma, there’s a great deal of pride in seeing the success of your fellow Mastermind group members. And the cool thing is they feel pride when you succeed too. And another special feeling, love.

So yeah, Masterminding is a little bit like parenting someone else’s kid.

Loyalty

Do You Give as Much as You Expect to Get?

Let’s talk a little bit about loyalty, shall we? I’m going to guess that loyalty means different things to different people. Some people think that they’re loyal, to friends, for example, but they are sporadic and undependable; yet satisfy themselves that that is “good enough”.

For me it’s not enough. I’m constantly accused by my husband of having too high expectations of other people. I beg to differ. I don’t expect anything different from other people than what I expect of myself. And one thing I pride myself on is when I have a friend I’m loyal to them and I stay that way.

Some of my friendships have ended and it’s always been when the so-called friend did something really hurtful that directly affected somebody I know, or love, or did something directly to me. Having said that though, I do watch how my friends treat other people. Because that is also a huge indicator of their true character. And true character is, in my book, the be-all-end-all.

For example, years ago an Exchange student of ours had a best friend she made here in the U.S.  These two girls not only treated my daughter horribly, but several other girls at the high school as well.  I would talk to my student about her good friend’s ultimate character, and her choice of friend.  It fell on deaf ears because to her, as long as the friend treated her well, how she treated others didn’t matter.  In the end – the poor character of both girls caused the falling out of several relationships.

I found this portion of the definition of loyalty on Wikipedia: Josiah Royce presented a different definition of the concept in his 1908 book The Philosophy of Loyalty. According to Royce, loyalty is a virtue, indeed a primary virtue, “the heart of all the virtues, the central duty amongst all the duties”. Royce presents loyalty, which he defines at length, as the basic moral principle from which all other principles can be derived. The short definition that he gives of the idea is that loyalty is “the willing and practical and thoroughgoing devotion of a person to a cause”. Loyalty is thoroughgoing in that it is not merely a casual interest but a wholehearted commitment to a cause. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loyalty)

In my Mastermind groups the loyalty that develops among the members is astonishing and yet I’m not surprised, because I have a tendency to choose people who really have true and loyal character; and for that I’m ever grateful. The expectation of my members to be loyal to each other is a good portion of the very foundation that High Stakes Mastermind Groups are made of.

I don’t particularly have an expectation that they will be loyal to me beyond the year in which somebody is a member. Having said that I’m enormously heartened by the number of members who have said they will continue to be a part of High Stakes Mastermind Groups for as long as they can imagine.

I’m not holding their feet to the fire and I know that there are no guarantees in life. I will tell you this though, hearing those words prompts me to be even more loyal to them in everything I do; during the meetings, behind-the-scenes, and continuously looking for contacts and opportunities to grow the businesses of each and every member. That is at the heart of High Stakes Mastermind Groups. And in their loyalty to the group, we all get as much as we give.